Sale!

U.S. Army Air Corps A-7 Aircraft Octant Dated 1941

$250.00 $199.00

Original Item: Only One Available. This a a very rare navigational instrument used on American bombers in WWII. The data plate on the transit chest reads:
U.S. ARMY AIR CORPS
AIRCRAFT OCTANT
TYPE NO. A-7 SERIAL No. AC-41-739
SPECIFICATION NO. 94-27747A
ORDER NO. AC-15814
MFR’S ASSY. DWG. NO. 3003-B
BENDIX AVIATION CORPORATION
PIONEER INSTRUMENT DIVISION
BENDIX, NEW JERSEY, U.S.A.
In January 1942 the Pioneer Instrument Division of Bendix Aviation received a contract worth $1,068,000 to make 2400 A-7 aircraft sextants for the Army Air Corps.
The A-7 was based on the instrument that Pioneer had introduced in 1931, but equipped with a finger activated pencil that enabled the navigator to make a number of vertical marks on a piece of roughened gray paper mounted below the index knob.
After each series of shots, these marks would be visually averaged, and the average time of the series determined from a stopwatch. Although the technique was relatively crude, the Army boasted that an experienced navigator using an in instrument of this sort could “set his plane down at the end of a transoceanic flight within an error radius of only 15 miles, less than four minutes’ flying time.
Offered in excellent condition.

Out of stock

Categories: ,

Description

Original Item: Only One Available. This a a very rare navigational instrument used on American bombers in WWII. The data plate on the transit chest reads:
U.S. ARMY AIR CORPS
AIRCRAFT OCTANT
TYPE NO. A-7 SERIAL No. AC-41-739
SPECIFICATION NO. 94-27747A
ORDER NO. AC-15814
MFR’S ASSY. DWG. NO. 3003-B
BENDIX AVIATION CORPORATION
PIONEER INSTRUMENT DIVISION
BENDIX, NEW JERSEY, U.S.A.
In January 1942 the Pioneer Instrument Division of Bendix Aviation received a contract worth $1,068,000 to make 2400 A-7 aircraft sextants for the Army Air Corps.
The A-7 was based on the instrument that Pioneer had introduced in 1931, but equipped with a finger activated pencil that enabled the navigator to make a number of vertical marks on a piece of roughened gray paper mounted below the index knob.
After each series of shots, these marks would be visually averaged, and the average time of the series determined from a stopwatch. Although the technique was relatively crude, the Army boasted that an experienced navigator using an in instrument of this sort could “set his plane down at the end of a transoceanic flight within an error radius of only 15 miles, less than four minutes’ flying time.
Offered in excellent condition.

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.